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Mythbusters: UConn/State of Connecticut Budget Edition

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Susan Herbst taking a pay cut won’t solve anything.

Herbst

A lot is being made about UConn, the state budget, and where it may leave Husky athletics. My “UConn” Tweetdeck column has had way too much garbage in it about this situation, so I’ve put together some answers to common objections to funding the state’s flagship school.

Myth #1: Why does UConn keep asking for more money while the state is struggling financially?

#Actually, UConn has endorsed a state budget that would cut its funding by $100 million, on top of over $100 million which has been cut from its budget since 2010. The school and administration are aware of the state’s economic situation and are prepared for cuts. $300 million is simply too much.

Myth #2: Bloated administrative salaries are keeping spending and tuition up, with no results! Maybe don’t pay President Susan Herbst so much!

First of all, the results have been great. UConn’s US News ranking has been consistently on the rise and reached its highest point, No. 56 in the country, top-20 public, shortly before this horrific news came out. Additionally, UConn has done a nice job of keeping administrative numbers relatively flat while increasing faculty numbers. UConn could cut out Herbst’s entire salary and still not make much of a dent in the school’s financial situation.

Myth #3: Make money from other sources!

Like what? A lemonade stand? Massive national expansion of The Dairy Bar? In 2017, for the first time in the school’s history, tuition has become a larger source of revenue than state aid. UConn’s rising tuition has been an area of criticism around the state, and rightfully so. Slashing the budget would only worsen the problem.

Myth #4: UConn will drop Division 1 athletics

Sorry, Susan et al. I will ride for UConn all day every day, but nobody believes this. If things are dire, would cutting football make sense? Maybe. Probably not, but maybe. Dropping out of Division 1 altogether makes zero sense. There isn’t a state in the country that doesn’t have its flagship playing Division 1 sports. Connecticut, though not the best-run state out there, will not be the first.