UConn men's basketball records perfect APR score

Ronald Martinez

Women's basketball, field hockey and 11 other programs get perfect marks as well.

So you know that whole narrative that people love to trumpet about how UConn's APR is terrible, the players are dumb and the school itself is an example of everything that is wrong with college athletics? Well, after this week, I think it's safe to say that anyone who still makes that argument is either an idiot or they're just not paying attention.

The NCAA released its 2012-13 APR scores for all Division I schools yesterday, and the results literally couldn't have been better for UConn. The men's basketball team, along with the women's basketball team, the field hockey team and 11 other Husky squads, recorded a perfect score of 1,000.

This comes after the men's team also recorded scores of 978 in the 2010-11 championship season and 947 in 2011-12, and should indicate that the program has now established a trend of academic success that dates back as long as any current UConn player has been a part of the team.

Why does this matter? Well, as I'm sure you all know, UConn's APR wasn't very good for a large portion of the past decade, and the problem came to a head in 2009-10 when the team's APR of 826 was so bad that the team wound up getting banned from last year's postseason. Granted, the NCAA changed the rules and applied them retroactively, which was and will always be total bullshit, but still, that 2009-10 team's score was so spectacularly terrible that something had to be done.

Changes were made, a greater emphasis was rightly placed on academics, and since Shabazz Napier and the 2010 recruiting class came to UConn, the Huskies have consistently proven their abilities both on and off the court, and things are only getting better. The players responsible for UConn's past academic failures have now been gone for almost five years, so hopefully between this week's news, last month's championship and Kevin Ollie's excellence, the whole notion that UConn men's basketball is some kind of renegade basketball factory can finally be put to rest.

You can read the full report on UConn's APR scores here, but here are a few more highlights from the university's release.

  • The UConn men's team's four-year average was 936, just above the threshold of 930. The reason its so low is because that 826 from 2009-10 is still included in the average, but the good news is the program's 2013-14 score is believed to also be a perfect 1,000. That means the four-year average should go way up next year when the 826 gets dropped from the calculations, pushing the Huskies well clear of any future APR danger.
  • A total of 14 UConn teams earned a perfect 1,000 APR score for the 2012-13 academic year, including men's basketball, women's basketball, men's cross country, field hockey, men's golf, women's rowing, men's soccer, women's soccer, softball, men's tennis, women's tennis, men's indoor track and field, men's outdoor track and field and volleyball.
  • Five UConn teams had perfect 1,000 four-year APR scores: men's cross country, field hockey, men's golf, women's tennis and men's outdoor track and field, while 20 UConn teams scored 970 or better in that mark.
  • The football team had a multi-year score of 957. The football team's score is six points higher than the average score for all football teams nationally, and it also had a 964 score in 2012-13, which was a point above the national FBS average.
  • The UConn field hockey, men's cross country, men's golf, men's indoor track and field, men's outdoor track and field and women's tennis programs earned NCAA Public Recognition Awards. These awards are given each year to teams scoring in the top 10 percent in each sport with their APRs.
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